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Despite growing up in a family with no other artists, Deladier Almeida started sketching when he was just five years old. His friends in his native country, Brazil, would pose for him while he created portraits that seemed beyond his years. When he got older, he studied urban planning, industrial design and architecture while working at a San Palo newspaper creating portraits of international heads of state. In 1985, Deladier moved to the United States where he attended UC Davis and began studying art more intensely. It was there that he met renowned artists Wayne Thiebaud, Roland Peterson and Roy De Forest, all of whom had an influence on the aspiring artist.

Working quickly, with an emphasis on improvised brushwork, Deladier Almeida captures the sense of traveling over the earth, geometric shapes of productive land passing in a mesmerizing array of shapes and colors.

With a rich palette and luscious brushwork, Deladier infuses vitality into each of his subjects, which range from portraits to scenes of contemporary life to brilliantly observed landscapes. His images of California’s varied terrain, depicted from a bird’s-eye view that Almeida achieves by flying over regions of the state in helicopters or small planes, are alive with texture and movement.

“The way my painting comes out is a function of the way I attack it,” he has said, adding, “I have to work on the edge of my rational mind.” As in the landscapes of Wayne Thiebaud, the images beautifully manipulate perspective, presenting us with compositions that pulse with life.